What some famous people looked like just after pasting...

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Lhmwrench
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What some famous people looked like just after pasting...

Post by Lhmwrench » Tue Jan 11, 2022 6:47 pm

...supposedly. :shrug

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FaceOnMars
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Re: What some famous people looked like just after pasting...

Post by FaceOnMars » Wed Jan 12, 2022 10:24 am

"Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence."

~ John Adams

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Re: What some famous people looked like just after pasting...

Post by FaceOnMars » Wed Jan 12, 2022 10:26 am

Image

Various views of the 1825 life mask of John Adams by John Henri Isaac Browere.
Fenimore Art Musuem in Cooperstown, New York is home to most of Browere's life mask busts. The top four images of Adams are the original plaster cast, currently in storage and not on public display. The bottom four images are the bronze copy that is on display.
Browere's casting process was done with his subjects sitting upright using a lighter plaster mixture that did not distort the facial features.
The life mask reflects how the ninety-year-old Adams had lost his teeth and refused to wear dentures.
“John Adams, whose dental health was apparently poor throughout his life. His pernicious habit of inducing vomiting to treat various bodily ills, coupled with a great love of sweets, led to the loss of his teeth, which he stubbornly refused to replace with dentures. When he was older, this led to his speech being so badly affected, that he could barely be understood.”
“At the age of 15, he was admitted to Harvard College and graduated from there in 1755. While at Harvard, he frequently wrote home about the poor quality of the food and commented that he subsisted principally on bread and beer, the latter brew most likely only weakly alcoholic. He had another pernicious habit, smoking, as well as chewing tobacco, which he began at age 8 and continued until well past the age of 70.”
“…he suffered from many colds and was burdened with heartburn, for which he found relief in drinking copious amounts of highly sugared tea. This, no doubt, added to his dental problems by promoting caries.”
Adams wrote, "Quincy, Mass., Nov. 23, 1825. This certifies that John H. I. Browere of the city of New York, has yesterday and to-day made two Portrait bust moulds on my person and made a cast of the first which has been approved of by friends. John Adams
See the reconstruction of Adams' life mask at https://yarbs.net/.../john-adams-life-m ... nstruction...
"Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence."

~ John Adams

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FaceOnMars
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Re: What some famous people looked like just after pasting...

Post by FaceOnMars » Wed Jan 12, 2022 10:27 am

Image

Various views of the 1825 life mask of James Madison by John Henri Isaac Browere.
Fenimore Art Musuem in Cooperstown, New York is home to most of Browere's life mask busts. The top four images of Madison are the original plaster cast, currently in storage and not on public display. The bottom four images are the bronze copy that is on display.
Browere's casting process was done with his subjects sitting upright using a lighter plaster mixture that did not distort the facial features.
According to David Meschutt's "A Bold Experiment: John Henri Isaac Browere's Life Masks of Prominent Americans","In preparing his subjects, Browere oiled the skin, eyebrows and hair, and put straws in the nostrils to facilitate breathing. He then warmed his mixture in order to make it more pliable and applied it in several light layers to the face and, in some cases, to the neck, shoulders, and chest of the subject. He allowed about twenty minutes for the plaster to set. When he removed the hardened plaster, he had a negative mold; by pouring plaster into the mold, he produced a positive cast of the subject's head. He then applied the mask to an armature and molded the torso in plaster. He refined the mask by by modeling open eyes and hair, but did not otherwise alter its appearance. The result was a startlingly realistic likeness, in no way idealized.
The substance which Browere applied to his sitter's face was his own invention. Earlier sculptors had used plaster of Paris but that is heavy material and can distort the shape of the face. Browere experimented with different mixtures of plaster until he finally produced a light weight substance. The exact composition of the medium was a closely-guarded secret which Browere passed along only to his son Albertus and which Albertus transmitted to no one."
Due to the lightness of Browere's plaster mixture the faces were not distorted and were considered very accurate likenesses. Jefferson endorsed his life mask bust, as did James and Dolley Madison when they saw it several days later. James Madison said of his own life mask, "Per request of Mr. Browere, busts of myself and of my wife, regarded as exact likenesses, have been executed by him in plaister, being casts made from the moulds formed on our persons, of which this certificate is given under my hand at Montpelier, 19, October, 1825."
Portrait painter Rembrandt Peale said of Marquis de Lafayette's life mask ... "The singular excellence shown by Mr. Browere in his new method of executing Portrait busts from the life deserves the applause and patronage of his countrymen. The bust of La Fayette, which he has just finished, is an admirable demonstration of his talent in this department of the Fine Arts. The accuracy with which he has moulded the entire head, neck and shoulders from the life and his skill in finishing, render this bust greatly superior to any we have seen. It is in truth a “faithful and a living likeness.” Of this I may judge having twice painted the General’s portrait from the life, once at Paris and recently at Washington.
Portrait painter, Samuel Finley Breese Morse states, "Being requested by Mr. Browere to give my opinion of his bust or cast from the person of General La Fayette, I feel no hesitation in saying it appears to me to be a perfect facsimile of the General’s face."
J. I. Browere’s “work achieved a stark realism uncommon in that day. His plaster busts showed the age-lined brow, the pock-marked face; his subjects appeared as they were, not as artists generally portrayed them. His life masks were, and remain, the most authentic likenesses of some historic figures who lived in a day before photography provided more easily obtained but similarly uncompromising portraits."
Unfortunately, life masks are unable to capture the details that most long to see: eye color, complexion, hair color etc.
According to friend Margaret Bayard Smith, James Madison’s “little blue eyes sparkled like stars from under his bushy grey eyebrows and amidst the deep wrinkles of his poor thin face."
With age, his complexion became yellowish, and his eyes “blepharitic” (i.e. puffiness around the eyes).
Browere's bust of Madison does not show his "widow's peak" comb over hairstyle we see so much in his portraits. This is shown in my reconstruction of Madison's life mask at yarbs.net
"Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence."

~ John Adams

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FaceOnMars
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Re: What some famous people looked like just after pasting...

Post by FaceOnMars » Wed Jan 12, 2022 10:29 am

Image

Various views of the 1825 life mask of Thomas Jefferson by John Henri Isaac Browere.

Fenimore Art Musuem in Cooperstown, New York is home to most of Browere's life mask busts. The first three images of Jefferson are the original plaster cast, currently in storage and not on public display. Shown in the fourth image is the bronze copy that is on display.

yarbs.net
"Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence."

~ John Adams

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pennsylvaniapete
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Re: What some famous people looked like just after pasting...

Post by pennsylvaniapete » Wed Jan 12, 2022 10:42 am

Fascinating
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